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Not So Serious w/ Chris Stussy

By Interviews, Not So Series

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years you would have heard of Chris Stussy. Himself alongside Prunk have grown PIV to be one of the most globally recognised labels and parties in the industry at the moment.

Recently the artist has launched his Up The Stuss imprint with a 3rd release expected in April after EPs from the likes of staple names in the scene Fabe and East End Dubs. His recent ‘Take A Leap Of Faith’ on Constant Sound has really turned heads with it being a nod to the deeper side of his productions. We caught up with him for our Not So Serious series..

1) If you could choose any stage, festival, or a city (or all in one) to play your first gig after the lockdown, where would it be?

That’s a tough question. There are so many places that I love playing. I think it would be in Amsterdam. A ten-hour set at Thuishaven during the day as a ‘festival’ and then ending the day in a club setting… somewhere like Shelter, with one of the best sound systems we have in our country… Haha, sorry I was just daydreaming about being back in the booth for a marathon like that.

2) Without thinking, name your most memorable set – either yours or any one of your choice?

Loveland Kingsday 2019. What a day… I was super anxious before the set but I was also full of excitement. Thinking back to this day makes me think of ‘Fury’s Laughter’ by S.A.M. – I’ve never seen a crowd reaction like that and afterwards, my inbox exploded because of everyone who wanted to know the track ID… the rest is history! I’m getting goosebumps while I’m thinking about that moment again!

3) Can you recall the last vinyl record you played at home?

So Inagawa ‘Yours Sincerely’ on Cabaret Records. When I discovered this track a few years ago I knew I had to grab the vinyl. I was playing some records at home last week and closed with this track. If you have a soft spot for deep chords, this is your tune.

4) Making a track feels like…

One of the best feelings. Being in the moment, just create whatever you want, no boundaries. I even forget what time it is haha. I sometimes say to my girlfriend I’m coming home in 30 minutes and 2 hours later I’m stuck in the groove again…

5) I find inspiration in my hometown when I think of…

Travelling, being around friends, having a good time. Going to a good party where the music is amazing. Hearing new tracks from my friends, there’s a lot of stuff that inspires me really.

6) Favourite drink after (or during) a set?

Vodka Redbull.

7) I’ll never forget that time when…

You have to dig for hours and hours on Discogs to find a track that you’ve heard at a party the weekend before – it happens a lot so it’s hard to forget!

8) If you have to pick one rooftop for a 12-hour set, where would it be?

I would say in London. I love the vibe in the entire UK, I feel really comfortable testing out new tracks there. The crowd is always very open to new music, it’s a very educated crowd so to say.

9) You are trapped in the jungle and are waiting to be rescued with 10% battery on your phone. iTunes/Spotify/Soundcloud are all working offline, name three tracks to accompany your waiting…

Richard Earnshaw feat. Ursula Rucker & Roy Ayers ‘Rise’
Georg Levin, Clara Hill ‘I Got Somebody New’
Robert Glasper ‘What Are We Doing’

10) My dream line up would be with…

12:00-14:00 Brawther
14:00-16:00 Sweely
16:00-18:00 Youandewan
18:00-21:00 Apollonia
21:00-23:00 Kerri Chandler

11) The greatest house vocal to date belongs to…?

Masters At Work feat. India ‘When You Touch Me’ (M.A.W. Remix) [1993]

12) My most sampled jazz record is?

Kool & The Gang ‘Summer Madness’

13) 2020…

2021 🙂

by zaq. | February 2021

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INTERVIEW W/ AKUFEN

By Interviews

There are not many artists who manage to define a particular era in music, and there are even fewer who know how to evolve beyond such achievements and find other creative paths down which to travel. We caught up with one of industries finest to learn more about his new EP, sampling tips and much more…

Photo credit: Petronille Gontaud-Leclair

1) Thank you for joining us today. How are you?

– The pleasure is all mine and I thank you for the invite to speak. I’d like to think that I’m doing alright overall, considering the rather challenging and uncertain times we live in since last March. Although I must admit that the complete standby of performing arts events feels like an unforgiving cleaver for many artists, including myself, who made a living from touring.  It’s definitely a major game-changer, but we’re in this together and I’m hopeful that we will overcome this situation in the end.  Meanwhile, I’m taking things a day at a time, focusing on my family which keeps me grounded and helps me in embracing resilience.

 

2) I think it’s safe to say you are very selective with your releases and labels that you work with – how do you decide what labels are right for you?   

– I wasn’t always selective, to be honest. I had my fair share of unfortunate experiences, which made me grow eventually more cautious and more selective over the years. When you’re a newcomer, it’s easy to succumb to the temptation of spreading fast by releasing on as many labels as possible. Which is understandable. But to be fair, I had more pleasant experiences as my career blossomed. Nowadays I don’t release much, but the labels I choose to release on are the ones that I feel understand where I’m coming from and where I wish to go. In the end, I just wish to collaborate with good and reliable people and feel like I’m part of something greater than just a commercial output, Perlon being the finest reference I could cite. When I met Thomas, Markus and Chris in Montreal in 2000, we became friends at first and then I had the wonderful privilege to become a part of this family of fantastic artists and very lovely human beings, which is Perlon.

3) Your new EP on Onysia Records is another fine example of your work In the studio, What did you use to produce it? – First off, collaborating with Joseph at Onysia was a true pleasure and I salute his generosity and kindness. Joseph gave me complete freedom, which is a rare thing these days when you deal with labels. What I found exciting was his sustained enthusiasm, which is very similar to mine when I started. Now, I rarely if never discuss gear, tools and tricks. I think every musician in their own right and for their own good has to figure out for themselves what works best for them. There isn’t one way to do things, and the most effective one will always be your own. We never ask kids to list the type of crayons, paint, paper and glue they used for tinkering in school. All I could suggest is, try out all sorts of stuff, never restrain your imagination, don’t think of the trends and just play around and have fun.

And I had fun recording this one.

4) Your use of samples in your work is some of the best in the game and so distinctive. Any tips for upcoming producers when working with samples and crafting their sound?

– Just be attentive and listen very carefully. Wherever we are in our daily lives, sounds surround us. The most insignificant noise can become a part of something beautiful and unique. Listen to them and what they are telling you. The art of sampling is partly intuitive and partly reflexive. In the end, you’ll figure ways to connect them and hear them converse.

5) It’s not very often you do interviews and you are very much famed for letting your music do the talking – do you think the media has become too much of a focal point around electronic music and artists?

 

I’m always glad to open up when I feel it’s relevant. Other than that I don’t feel the obligation to unnecessarily fill the corner of a page of some DJ magazine, to sell my mug, share my tricks and brag about my lifestyle, which isn’t very glamorous. I am as selective with journalists as I am with labels, and friends. The journalists I respected over the years have become friends. There is nothing wrong with the media becoming the focal point around electronic music and its players. What’s concerning is the focal point on the glitter rather than the music itself. I just despise the star rating, following and liking culture, and journalism in general which is validating and discrediting often without discernment. You’re either in the game or out of the game. Art is too personal to give it a thumb up or down. This is straight out of the Roman Empire playbook.

6) Back in your early years you were active in the scene in Montreal under many other aliases. What made you move to your Akufen sound?

– So much! An insatiable appetite for music, films and books. Years spent in art school, and most of all, a constant need for change. The idea primarily behind the Akufen sound was to work from my intuition and subconscious. It was also very much inspired by the “automatic writing” and “cut & paste” methods, which was developed by the surrealists, the beat poets and the automatists collective in Canada in the forties and fifties. These techniques have been at the centre of my creativity since as early as my childhood. I have fond memories of meticulously crafting large collages of pictures cut from magazines and working with double tape decks in my bedroom, rather than playing with other kids outside. It’s about creating an unpredictable, and unique sound environment, and a story which leaves more room for personal perception and interpretation as it unfolds. I believe that my generation was lucky as we came at a time when everything was possible, and people were ready and all ears. You could throw a Tito Puente piece in a set and the crowd would go nuts. Today, there are too many politics and laws to embrace in order to fit in. There are still some oddballs out there who amaze me, but the music sales business has made their music less accessible to the general public, sadly.

7) You’ve graced your presence at some of the world’s best clubbing institutions and have seen many changes in our industry and clubbing landscape over the years – where do you see it going from here, particularly with the current situation having such a significant impact on venues and promoters?

– I could not say honestly. We are all still in shock, trying to adjust to this new reality. Options and ideas will unfold as we start healing and getting our lives back to some kind of normalcy. The pandemic has put on the back burner all public music activities and I believe it will affect not only the scene but the music itself. I have a feeling that the music will evolve in unexpected and surprising forms, and it will be interesting to see how artists will adapt and overcome this situation. I for myself, don’t want to speculate much, I am not even sure that I will pursue my career on the road. I will, however, remain active as a musician, there is no doubt about that, but I’m contemplating other avenues such as film scoring, art installations in collaboration with artists from other fields. I might as well return to visual art and graphic design which I studied in school. It’s clearly a time for radical changes, and I’m hopeful we’ll figure something out. Having said that, we must not look back in nostalgia, because things will never be as they were. Clubbing or not, music will prevail, one way or another, and that’s what’s reassuring in a way.

8) Your live show is something which has brought a lot of attention. What is your set up for this and what made you want to move into a live setup?

– I’ll be bluntly honest, playing live is what puts bread on the table for most of us. I was able to feed and provide shelter for my family and send my kid to school with touring. I am overly conscient of the luck I had to be able to travel doing the greatest job. It had its flaws at times, but overall I can only be immensely grateful. I’ve always made it a priority to be as generous and available as possible for those who support me and who will sometimes travel miles to hear me. So performing is not only a way of making ends meet but also a responsibility and an act of loyalty. Night after night you have to leave the rest behind and give your best, no matter how tired or sick you may feel. We must never forget that without the record labels and club owners, the promoters, bookers, agents and the public we wouldn’t have the privilege of doing what we love most. As for my set up, there’s not much to brag about, I use a laptop, a soundcard and a couple of controllers.

9) To stay so relevant for so long takes a lot of drive and passion.  How do you push yourself to achieve your goals and keep creatively motivated?

– I believe honesty and integrity were the main keys in remaining relevant, in my case. Being stubborn and uncompromising creatively comes at a high cost, but I agreed to pay that price at an early stage in my career, and I don’t regret it. I couldn’t live with myself otherwise. I rather enjoy a more modest success based on loyalty and which will last after I’m gone. What’s left of us, is what makes us immortal. Not in a glorious historical sense, but rather in a humble inspirational way, primarily for my daughter, and the generations to come. Not only as an artist but as a man of my times. No matter what you do, you got to have faith, you also got to have doubts, never take anything for granted, and be grateful for everything you got. I have to remain continuously.

Photo credit: Petronille Gontaud-Leclair

10) Where does 2021 take you? Do you have any new projects on the horizon you can tell us about?

In January, I launched “Ourway”, my new record label, introducing a first Akufen release which you can currently listen to and purchase online at Juno.  The name of the label speaks for itself. I’m aware that starting a new label is a bit of a gamble right now, but I thought it was worth giving it a shot.

I finished recording the new Horror Inc. album last year, and I am in the process of discussing its release in 2021, on “Anoma”, a Montreal based label run by my buddy Ohm Hourani.

There is also a possible 20th Anniversary re-issue of “My Way” on the new label, but it has to be confirmed. As for the new Akufen album, it’s done, but I don’t see it happening until next year.

2021 isn’t gonna take us anywhere. We will have to take 2021 somewhere. Sadly, I had to let go of my studio when the pandemic started, and everything’s been sitting in boxes since July of last year. Relocalizing is complicated for now, but I have faith that I’ll find a new place when the social restrictions soften. As for now, all music work is on hold. Stay tuned, we will return after this pandemic.

Words by Jordan Diston

BUYING RECORDS FROM EUROPE? AVOID SURPRISE CHARGES!

By News

 

 

 

Brexit has created another unnecessary issue for us in the UK when recently innocent bystanders have been charged excessive import / VAT taxes on top of the cost of products purchased online.

There’s nothing worse than you finally coping that extra rare bit of wax off Discogs that you’ve paid good money for then having to pay an extra 25% just to get it off the delivery driver! We’re hearing some car crash situations of buyers purchasing large amounts of records from record stores and having to pay fees on top.

At a time where saving money is at the top of most our lists here are a couple of hints and tips Meoko have discovered when ordering wax online to avoid any surprise charges.

 

ASK SELLER TO ISSUE AS A GIFT

 You can receive a gift up to the value of £39 without any taxes or charges added. Ask your sellers to declare the value of the package as under £10 (to be safe) and that is a gift they are sending.

 

SPLIT YOUR ORDER AND KEEP COST DOWN

You can order up to a value of £135 and not be charged any import taxes or charges. Got loads in your cart? Your best splitting your orders, so the value of the packages are reduced below this.

 

ENSURE UK VAT IS APPLIED

If you are purchasing records from a record store not based in the UK make sure they are adding UK VAT on at their shopping cart when you come to pay. If they don’t UK VAT can be added when it enters the country.

 

Learn more about the new import taxes.

Words: Jordan Distan

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Ableton Live 11 is coming!

By Tech Talks

Ableton is a staple programme in many of our home studio set-ups. Already famed as a go-to software choice for bringing your wildest creations to life things are looking exciting as they have just recently announced their new Ableton 11 update.

This will be released in early 2021. Take a look a the new features coming to raise your production game >>

 

Not got Ableton yet? For a limited time, only you can save 20% on Live 10, get a free upgrade to Live 11. With lockdown’s in place, what is a better time to start and get stuck in?

Find out more from the Ableton shop.

Words: Jordan Distan

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A Fallen Hero: DiY’s Pete Woosh Has Died

By News

It’s with great regret that Pete ‘Woosh’ Birch, founding member and influential figure in Nottingham’s DiY Collective, has passed away after a five-year battle with cancer.

If you scratch under the surface of dance music heritage in the UK it won’t take you long to stumble across DiY Soundsystem. The outfit was a seminal part of the acid house raves scene back in the early 90s, to many most notably being a part of the collection of sound systems which threw the infamous party at Castlemorton 1992. An estimated 20,000 – 40,000 party revellers enjoying the delights of the party which went on nearly a week. This resulted in the Criminal Justice Bill driving parties from fields into clubs full time in the UK. In a weird way, you could say we wouldn’t be here doing what we do today in this capacity without people like Pete pushing the way forward.

 

 

He was also responsible for one of the hottest nights in the UK at the time; Bounce which welcomed guests including Sasha, Laurent Garnier, DJ Pierre, Andrew Weatherall, Larry Heard, Derrick Carter and many more. From parties all over the UK, Amsterdam, San Francisco, Dallas and Ibiza it’s safe to say the DiY we’re absolutely on fire in their prime years. The collective was holding multiple parties a week at some stages. The infamous DJ duo Digs & Woosh along with Simon DK and many others of the DiY entourage were known for their dedication to music and bringing joy to many dance floors across the world.

Pete was also responsible for launching the labels Strictly 4 Groovers and DiY Discs releasing 100s of records. The imprints brought artists like Nail, Atjazz, Rhythm Plate, Inland Knights and many more to light. These records are still found in many of favourite DJs sets to this day and are an essential part of any serious house diggers collection.

 

After being diagnosed with highly aggressive head and neck cancer in December of 2015, Pete decided to take a natural approach to treatment and launched his The 52 Card Trick project. He wanted to give something back to everyone that helped him when he was diagnosed. The label would release 3 tracks a week for 52 weeks. It saw the likes of Brawther, Yueseke, Nail, Hot Toddy and Schmoov, as well as many others, release a brilliant selection of diverse music. All proceeds from the project went towards organisations which offered support with cancer, none of which received government funding. These included Active Cancer Therapy Support, Together Against Cancer and The Penny Brohn Centre.

DiY recently celebrated their 30th birthday in 2019; an achievement which is truly unique and special in its own right. How? Still sticking to the ethos that has served them so well over all these years. A family of like-minded people coming together for the love for music.

You only have to look on the DiY facebook page to see how many people Pete inspired over the years with floods of testaments, stories, nods of respect and admiration.

Thoughts going out to everyone suffering from his loss. The world we love has lost a rare breed indeed.

Rest in peace Pete ‘Woosh’ Bird.

Thank you for being you.

X

Words: Jordan Distan

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MEOKO celebrates 20 years of Cynosure Recordings!

By News

 

Cynosure Recordings celebrates its 20th anniversary with a Compilation of epic proportions including Dewalta & Shannon, Brett Johnson, The Mole, Matthew Johnson and many more.

 

20 years is an impeccable length of time to keep any imprint current and relevant. You only have to look at the support they have received from across the industry over the years to see they have done just that with their records being played by the likes of Ricardo Villalobos, Raresh, D’Julz, Sonja Moonear, Doc Martin and Ryan Crosson to name a few.

The label still continues at the same pace and consistency that it always did.  Never flooding the overly saturated underground market and only releasing a handful of quality releases a year.

 

But how did it start and where did it all begin?

 

Many moons ago when a couple of friends in the sleepy Canadian town of Kitchener, Ontario got together and merged their studios. Mike Shannon and Jason Hunsberger put together the little gear that they had and created a makeshift studio called the Onom room.

 

Together the two would create a project called the Sunaj Assassins and would later create a record label to showcase their work. At the time the two young producers were involved in a provincially funded arts collective called K.O.R. The initial idea of the Cynosure Recordings label was meant to showcase a number of the artists and musicians involved in the collective as well as other artists in the province. But shortly before the first release was set the project funding was pulled and the project was momentarily sidelined.

 

But it was too late for all the work to be wasted and the project shelved, so in 1999, Mike and friends got the funds together and continued to make the dream Cynosure Recordings a reality.

In 20 years the underground market has gone through some big changes but things with Cynosure’s releases remain the same.  Timeless Dance Tracks.

You can actually enjoy the digital version of compilation by purchasing it on Bandcamp today from here.

Words: Jordan Diston

Guy J Raises 24K Dollars for his new track on streaming service Powered By Cryptocurrency

By Tech Talks

The struggle is real for many smaller and mid-tier artists trying to generate revenue from their music with many resigning to the fact that they will never make any type of income until live gigs come back. Many platforms have been working to help solve this problem, but none quite like the new music streaming platform ROCKI.

ROCKI has just announced its launch and first major success story with progressive house artists Guy J raising over $24k for his release “Cotton Eyes.” ROCKI’s platform is the beginning of something very exciting for artists that have been looking for alternative ways of monetizing and raising money for their music. In a way you might call ROCKI part Kickstarter and part investment opportunity, now fans can support their favorite artists by investing in their work and getting a share of royalties to boot.

More about ROCKI:

ROCKI, the new music streaming platform on the blockchain just launched their first Royalty income right music NFT, which sold for a record 40 ETH ($24,200 USD at the time of writing)!

ROCKI is a music streaming service and digital payments ecosystem designed to solve some of the most fundamental problems of the music industry. Powered by the ROCKS token, it is the first platform that rewards both the artists for their streams and the listeners for their participation.

ROCKI has launched two unique music NFT’s on the ROCKI platform (a ERC721 Music NFT & a ERC1155 Music NFT), with the first Royalty income right Music NFT (a ERC721 Music NFT) selling for a record 40 ETH ($24,200 USD at the time of writing).

The Israeli born, Malta-based progressive house music genius, Lost & Found label boss, and ROCKI artist, Guy J, has just released a new exclusive track on ROCKI, COTTON EYES. This new exclusive track sold an ERC721 Music NFT contract for 50% of future Royalty rights on ROCKI, auctioned off on the Bounce.finance platform for a record amount of 40 ETH ($24,200 USD at the time of writing).

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Legit Trip – Dreams EP [Purple Box]

By Reviews

After the initial release by Lee Onel on the digital sister-label, newborn Purple Box is ready to raise the standard with a 4-tracker vinyl EP by Legit Trip, backed with remixes from Juliche Hernandez and Ilya Schulz. The entitled “Dreams” EP comes from one of the fastest rising talents in the Russian scene who literally took the Beatport charts by storm last year with his unmistakable deep-tech approach, releasing on labels such as DPE, Aprapta and Bla Bla to name a few. He now debuts on Purple Box, which will be responsible for constantly sharing fresh groovy vibes from the south of Italy, as the label is the result of the union of famous Pressology Distribution and Effetto Disclosure.

 

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Click HERE to buy Dreams EP – PBOX001

 

Starting out with “Dreams“, Legit Trip provides his trademark stripped-back groove together with a slick bass which initially covers only the lowest frequencies and gradually opens itself to the whole spectrum. When the pads and stab kick in, the piece immediately jumps into a groovy minimal tech dimension, whilst the open hats cut the mix super swingy. To complete the track, crisp jazzy riffs give another boost to the piece, remaining well-balanced with the addition of vocal chops that bounce nicely on the beat.

 

 

The joyful atmosphere of the first track is opposed to the darker “En Dehors“. Airy pads almost sound like a choir, heavily processed. Drums roll tight and definite, with the right amount of thickness. Bass rumbles underneath the whole track, rolling and melting smoothly with the stabs. Hypnotic and intimistic, the piece goes round and round, rarely breaking the never-ending rotation. Trippy high-pitched percs flutter with their long tail, opening up to a new layer of tiny sounds.

 

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 Legit Trip

 

On the flip, Spanish groover Juliche Hernandez (UNCANNY) signs the first remix and his strong temper emerges from the very start, as he delivers a classy and heavy minimal number. The stomping kick drum still leaves some room to the other elements, with the woody percussions in full-focus above a dynamic texture. On this version, the vocal is pitched down and brings even more drama to the floor, even if the biggest merit goes to the thunderous implacable bassline. Airy stab arises and starts wandering following the delay on top of the groove, creating a flawless interplay. When the piece gets dry again, once again we get swept up by the huge rolling bass and the powerful drums.

 

 

Lastly, Ilya Schultz takes over with his sunny re-interpretation of “Dreams“. Starting with a bouncy stab, the track takes shelter immediately in a tunnel and starts speeding. Drums populate smoothly, with a pumping and swingy clyster clear groove that rushes the whole thing up to the break. The Moscow-based DJ and producer takes the jazzy riffs from the original, filtering them just a little, enough to make them look like bubbles about to blow, right before going down and then ascending quickly during the break. Slapping groove with loads of soul. 

 

 

 

Words by Francesco Quieti & Francesco Zambianchi

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Music Review: Various Artists – OLDiViBES 171

By Music Reviews, Reviews

There are certain labels that you know already before you hear the EP that you’re in for a pleasantly mind-bending audible experience. iO (Mulen)’s OLDiViBES ticks this box inside and out. Next up to the plate on the sort after imprint is a VA from 5 artists who are making waves across the circuit at the moment in their own right; Vitess, Mandana, Andrea Caioni, Josh Baker & Alfie Jack.

 

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Click HERE to buy OLDI171

 

The A-side kicks straight into play with Vitess using thunderous kicks and nimble hats to instantly grab your attention. The introduction of robotic pads and electronic synths teleport you to another dimension. Soft under layers and a driving bassline keep you moving. It’s the breakdown where all the elements really come into their own. The synth arrangement here takes you straight back to Acid House movement of 89’ alongside tight breakbeat percussion elements before dropping back into the groove. A grade weapon material.

 

 

Following on, Fuse (BE) resident Mandana shows her prowess in the studio. Distinct percussion and crystal clear hats accompany voltaic synths which instantly grab your attention. The introduction of a heart-warming bassline sets the tone of the track throughout. The contrast of ever the building hypnotic synths, precision like percussion and dub undertones works perfectly here.

 

Flipping it over to the B side and we begin a journey through space and time. The layers of this track evolve effortlessly. A master class in arranging from Andrea sees hi-end synths come and go throughout. Skipping hats and tight kicks create the energy and groove complementing the progressive synths. This is one that builds and builds and you’re more than happy to go with it as it does.

 

 

The EP concludes with duo Josh Baker & Alfie JackThis is not the first time they have collaborated in the studio; producing yet again a sound perfectly blended and distinctively influenced from both their own individual styles. Intricate pads, accompanied by a deep and resounding bassline send you flying across the skies. New elements are introduced carefully throughout allowing the track too effortlessly develop.

 

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Label owner iO (Mulen)

 

 

Safe to say this is an EP that will be enjoyed on many dancefloors across the world. Another one for the bag from OLDiViBES.

 

 

Words by Jordan Diston

Meander 29 Cover Digital

Music Review: Alci – Can’t Dance EP [Meander]

By Music Reviews, Reviews

Alci is one of those names in the minimal house scene that has been constantly dropping solid releases, a mixture of sophisticated music with a balance of groove and thoughtful flair that captures listeners and dancers alike. His latest work is no exception to the rule, released on DeWalta’s forward-thinking and top quality Meander label. The entitled “Can’t Dance” – inspired by the weird moment we’re all living in – is a four-tracker EP full of bass-jackin’ heavy tunes that reflect the high energy, versatility and laidback style of the young Swiss DJ and producer. The EP covers a good range of tones within minimalistic and technoid soundscapes perfect for anything between late-night dancing and early after-hours.

 

Meander 29 Cover Digital

Click HERE to buy Can’t Dance EP

 

Opener ¨Can’t Dance¨ starts off the recording with a walking jazzy bassline, enveloping the listener’s feet and head into a trippy funky groove. The bass dissonances from the glitchy elements and percussive textures in the middle ground section of the song adding a surrealistic feel. The irony of the vocal recording repeating the song’s title, in different pitched registers makes the track both fun and weird, a vibrant minimal roller that keeps feet moving despite the song’s contradictory title.

 

 

¨Sonsuz Seconds¨ takes form as a minimal house track with a more upbeat energetic groove cleverly spiced with organic and tribal sounds alike. Sparking warm percussions hypnotically captivate the listener as they respond to the deep and funky bassline that intensely carries the momentum forward. The glittering clicks and textures combine with full-bodied and acoustic percussions as it transports the listener to a tropical vortex-like dream. The track’s tone is emphasized with the gentle yet sharp synth that creates a type of pause and melodious colourful tension as it alternates with the driving force of the heated drumming polyrhythms. The combination of the robust kick, the open hi-hat, a sharp clave, and a crispy clap brings the track together as dancefloor minimal house weapon. 

 

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On the flip, ¨Kelime Bir ¨ conveys a darker toned mood, with dry percussive clicks and drums that evoke a minimal techno dominance and somberness. Modular and analogue synthesizer melodic pads flow as they collide and drift in a dense sea of low-end sound waves. The vocal sample subtlety whispers distorted words which creates a mysterious ambience, while the closed jazzy hi-hat keeps pushing against the beat. The unexpected piano melodies, along with a nice rhythmic lead and syncopated bassline make for a flammable yet inviting musical cocktail.

 

 

Closing off, ¨Kelime Iki¨, dwells in a dusky mood and atmospheric minimal track. The track’s drumming entrances the mind with low-end frequencies that resonate steadily in time. The clap accentuates and moves the energy forward as it complements the downbeat in a simple yet effective manner. Shortly after, mumbling voices appear adding a sense of depth and enigmatic dynamism. Short synth pads leak into the foreground while incorporating cleverly a straight-headed hi-hat that firmly raises the dynamics of the track. The low-end bassline reproduces ascending notes which coast smoothly along with the beat. While pads with trippy bends surround the air as delicate deft tones. Once again, Alci proves that it is possible to seemingly combine simple backbone elements with refined details in a reductive and alluring composition while keeping the dancefloor on edge. “Can’t Dance” EP has already sold out in various record stores so don’t sleep on Meander’s latest addition to their catalogue. 

 

 

 

 

Words by Daniel Ordoñez