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If you are, or have been living in London and are part of London’s long term clubbing community, then the chances are that your Facebook news feeds have been taking a nostalgic overhaul in times of recent in newly set up group ‘Remember The End’:

‘I will never forget seeing Derrick Carter play at the Classic Music Company nights. One night, after what I’m sure was a whole bottle of Patrón, he put me in a headlock at the end of his set, rubbed the top of my head with his knuckles and shouted “You’re disco inferno, baby!” Good times

And if this means nothing to you, yet you love everything about house and techno, then there is someone out there who aims to put that right, spreading knowledge of the dance music scene and doing it all with a social conscience.

We talk to the man on a mission, the person who is responsible for starting the hurdle of rave nostalgia and won’t rest until all the tales have been aired out in public. Adam Mcloughlin chats to us about how he is urging young talent to get involved, and Dig Deeper.

 

What is Dig Deep TV?

From a public perspective Digdeep.tv is going to be a hub for all things electronic music.  But we plan on doing things very differently to other media platforms.  Our aim is to bring something good to the table for everyone concerned.  Ultimately our main goal is education.  This comes in the form of creating work experience and development opportunities for students and graduates as well as educating music fans about the history of the genres and artists.  To date there has not been much out there for people who want to know the backstories of the people who make the music we love.  It’s all about good vibes and incredible stories that rarely get told.

What was the turning point that inspired you to start a company like this?

 I had worked for a children’s cancer charity as a marketing manager and we were donated some money by a small government funded radio station.  We went to meet them are discovered that they had been given over £75,000 in funding.  The reason being they were creating work experience opportunities for people who were long term unemployed.  I struggled to understand where the money was going.  It gave me a few ideas of my own and I had a few contacts in the music industry.  Essentially I started to think of how I could things better and what would I do?  Then my good friend Richard West AKA Mr.C became a catalyst to some pretty exciting ideas.  In typical Mr.C style he pushed things a few steps further than I had previously conceived.

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A big part of Dig Deep it seems is creating opportunities for post grads and young people in general wanting to get into the creative field. Why do you think it is necessary to create a platform like this now? Do you think something like this would have had as much impact a few years ago?

 What needs to be addressed is the exploitation of young people by corporate fat cats.  The problem is this goes back much further than a few years ago.  The UK used to be the worlds greatest manufacturer and exporter of fossil fuels.  When you take those industries away you are left with trades and higher education.  But trade training has been destroyed since the days of the YTS (youth training scheme) and companies wont invest in young people like they used to.  University is more popular than ever with a decreasing employment market.  So you could spend 3 to 4 years at university only to find yourself having to spend another year on unpaid internship just to get the experience needed to move on in life.  Even then there are no guarantees.   So imagine a low income family who cannot afford to support a young person on an unpaid internship.  Imagine having to struggle for 4 or 5 years only to end up working as an unappreciated cog in a corporate machine.  Have you ever had to explain yourself to some jobs worth sad case why you have spent over 20 minuets in a month having a piss?  I have.  I have also had to be put on “absence counseling” because I was off work with a broken wrist.  “is there anything you could have done to prevent this”, said my manager.  “Yeah I suppose I could wrap myself in bubble wrap outside of working hours to ensure I am a fully functioning phone monkey for you lovely people”.  I didn’t last long there to be honest.  Nobody who invests in himself or herself should have to resort to that type of bullshit in my opinion.  And the thought of being in that position with a huge debt leads me to believe that perhaps this environment is manufactured to keep clever and ambitions people in their place.

The other element of Dig Deep is educating young electronic music fans a bit more about where the culture comes from, somewhat of a ‘raver finishing school’ before they set out into the big bad world of clubbing! Do you think this historical knowledge is something missing from the scene, which at the moment is welcoming in such a huge influx of newer, younger fans?

 For some people “the scene” is a place to wear stupid V neck t-shirts, abuse steroids and be a general burden to the rest of us.  Orange cleavages with no banter and that’s just the lads.  Our target market is the individuals who are into the music not scenesters.  I would say we were more like an open university than a finishing school only there are no qualifications for being a know it all.  There is nothing worse than a scene geek except maybe the Geordie Shore wannabes.  Obviously I have some personal dislikes to “the scene” but we all do.  People tend to either exit the scene early on or stick around and become an integral part of it.  The technology available has created a lot of overnight DJ’s and digital downloads has seen a decline in quality music.  Our aim is to take people back into the past so that they can experience some amazing quality tracks rather than everyone playing the Beatport top 100 at every after party on a midi controller.  Younger enthusiasts of house music are going to be in for a treat when they realize that the timeline of great music goes back in time as well as forward.  There is a whole universe of tracks to be discovered and a lot of respect is due to those artists.  This is where the name Digdeep comes from.  The days of hunting in records shops has seen a decline but we think that we are going to assist with the current vinyl revival.  When people discover the art of DJ’ing we hope they come to the same conclusion as us.  Djing and collecting music as product of passion and an art form, not a product of the ego and a fly by night hobby.  And for those who simply collect and appreciate good quality music we have over 3 decades for you to explore.  But its not just about the past.  Its also about the future of music because you need to know where you came from in order to have a good grasp on where you are going.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8_xk6dgW-4

In your promo videos I can see that you have Mr C on board for your first documentary, how did this collaboration come about?

 Mr.C is from another planet.  I approached him and told him about my ideas and he got what we were about from the beginning.  The reason I approached him is because 8/10 people I spoke to about him had no idea he was the lead man out of the Shaman.  After singing the chorus from Ebenezer Goode the look the faces told me that people didn’t really know much about his past.  When I told them he pretty much created tech-house they seemed gob smacked.  It’s a testament to his career because he is always 2 steps ahead of anyone else.  I got to know Mr.C at a small festival and after that it was his ideas about life and spirituality that got my attention.  When I approached him 7 months ago and explained my idea he was on board.  When I did some more research I realized we had a documentary on our hands.  When I explained that I had never made a documentary in my life and didn’t know how to use or even own a video camera he simply said.

“Don’t worry mate, the universe will provide”.

As predicted the Universe did provide and it provided well!  Out of nowhere all the relevant and like-minded people seemed to fall into my lap and we were off.

What can we expect to see in the final product?

 Well that depends on your involvement.  On the first of October we are going to announce the details of a post-production party.  If you experience the final product at that then you can expect to see a wristband in the post and a rave line number.  You can expect to relive 1988 / 1989 by following in the footsteps of the first ravers ever.  When you get to the secret venue you can expect to see lots of smiling faces enjoying the final product on a huge screen followed by a giant party featuring some of the most important artists from the past present and future.  If you experience the documentary from home you will see an raw and no holds bard documentary that exposes the full truth of those times and Mr.C as an important character of those times.  You have to remember that this is being broadcast on the internet and we have nobody to answer to.  There are some gritty and dark moments and there are some pretty hilarious stories to be told.  The plot keeps thickening as the days go by so at this moment even I don’t know!  But what I do know is that people who see the finished documentary will witness the post production party and wish they were there.  Its looking pretty special J

I also see you’ve set up a Facebook group ‘Remembering The End’ what has been the response to this so far?

The End club was a place that I was never fortunate enough to experience so I set the group as a research tool for the documentary.  I added an employee of Superfreq and a former employee of the End Paul McCormack to the group.  2 days and over 1000 requests later the group was buzzing with activity.  People posted pictures and memories that to be honest got be a bit emotional.   We felt the vibe from the place when we met Richard there and it all made sense when we witnessed the love of the venue and the love that those people shared for each other.

Can you tell us who else you have in the pipeline or do we have to wait and see?

At the moment all I can say is we have contacted the obvious characters and they are on board with the concept of Digdeep.tv  When you do things from the heart and not the pocket you find that people want to help.

Your promo video also mentions a campaign to go along with the launch of the first documentary. Tell us more about this please! 

The documentary could have been funded by government funding however we may have been restricted by what we could and could not say.  So we decided to fund the documentary with crowd funding.  This means that people who attend the post production party will be funding it as well as a few sponsors.  The campaign we are running through our Facebook page started as a way to let people know about what is in the pipeline so that fans got first refusal to the party.  The places are obviously limited so we wanted those place to go to fans and not scenesters.  On the 1st of October there will be a short video and a link to a place where you can buy tickets or order limited edition versions of the documentary, which will be much longer than the online version we release.  We created an event to alert people a day before a network of international DJ’s tells the world so they can get in first.  We expected a good response but what we did not expect was the response from the USA.  We ended up having to cater for both New York and Los Angelies with post production parties.  We currently have some amazing artists and a film festival manager working on that for us.  After all of this hard work I should be able to treat my team to a well deserved holiday if all goes well!

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What do you have planned for the post production event?

 Only the post production party attendees will know that.  We a few different locations catering to the response levels.  The more people that come the bigger and better the experience will be.  Even at the bottom end its going to be special and unique.

What are you hoping to achieve with Dig Deep and where are your future plans headed?

 It has been like a game of chess.  We have several goals and several ways to achieve it with some of the music industries most respected individuals taking part.  In order our priorities are

Create careers for people who deserve them

Give artists the credit they deserve

Improve the quality of electronic music through education

Help undiscovered artists to develop and create more opportunity

Turn the corporate world upside-down

Finally, what tune first inspired you to Dig Deep into the world of house and techno?

When I was younger it was about glow-sticks and pulling funny faces in chill-out rooms listening to hard house.  They I grew up.  The first house track that sorted my head out was Derrick Carter “where you at”.  That’s a good question and the lyrics seem to ring true with where I am at now.

The world has changed, or is it me that’s new?
A different set of morals from a different set of clues
So still I wonder, is this all there is to life?
The ever changing cycles, of a world that’s damp and ripe

There must more, yeah in my heart I hold to this
I’ve known the joy of love and I’ve seen the peace and bliss
But as you know, all things must end, except the need for faith
And the spirit that’s within to keep you strong

When it seems you’re ’bout to break
Just call upon the strength within and plant it as your stake

Move forward with power, program yourself to feel
With depth enough to know what’s up and heart to sense the real

Where you at?

In a world that’s changing for the worse you have to call upon the strength within.   You need to dig deep if you want to climb high.

Find out more about DigDeep.tv here.

 

Interview by Eileen Pegg

 

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